It’s a Matter of Attention: Making Your Start-up Business Video Stand Out

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CameraAll publicity is good publicity, only if they spell your name right. With this kind of understanding of self-promotion, any growing business will want to show the world they are a company worth patronizing and watching.

One of the ways people will remember you is through your first corporate video. To stay on the safe side, here are a few things you have to consider when creating your start-up video:

Hire Professionals

While it may cost you less to use your own employees and managers for your corporate videos, it might not exactly translate positively onscreen. Hiring internally for something that you will publish publicly might not leave a good taste on your audience if you will be using people who don’t know how to talk, act, and look good on camera.

The same goes for hiring a crew that don’t have the professional credentials to match the business environment and public face you want people to see. As what KirkDouglasVideoProductions.com says, never compensate quality for budget cuts.

Invest in Equipment

A company video is an entirely different genre of film making. It requires a professional look with a little boost from advanced equipment, which might not be available on hand. If you have people who can lend things like programs, cameras, and even make-up for your cast, be nice and ask for their permission.

Renting equipment is also another option. Better yet, hire a video production agency that can provide the equipment and effects you need for your corporate video.

Take No Chances

Filming a three to five minute video can take far more than thirty minutes if you want to get everything right. You have to think about proper lighting, mistakes the cast or the production staff might make, and even unexpected errors in the videos. With this in mind, thorough preparation of the script, the tools, and even the number of takes is important.

Take zero chances with every scene. If you can utilize multiple cameras recording from different angles, do so. Give your cast enough time to briefly rehearse and run through each scene. It all comes down to reducing cost and time wasted in re-recording a scene.

The value of a company is in its people, and this can translate to how a business represents itself through its promotional material. As long as you provide something valuable, your audience will be delighted with the impression you leave.